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AWS TRAINING SCHEDULE
DASH AWS – CWI
PROGRAMME
 
FOR 2014
MON
SEMINAR
PLACE
JAN 10 DAYS VADODARA
JAN 10 DAYS PONDICHERRY
JAN 10 DAYSPONDICHERRY
FEB 10 DAYS DUBAI
FEB 10 DAYS CHENNAI
MAR 10 DAYS PONDICHERRY
APRIL 10 DAYS VADODARA
APRIL 10 DAYS DUBAI
APRIL 10 DAYS CHENNAI
MAY 10 DAYS THAILAND
MAY 10 DAYS SINGAPORE
MAY 10 DAYS PONDICHERRY
JUNE10 DAYSPONDICHERRY
JULY10 DAYSVADODARA
JULY10 DAYSCHENNAI
AUG - SEP

15 DAYS(PREPARATORY)

&

5 DAYS

KOLKATA
AUG10 DAYSCHENNAI
SEP10 DAYSSINGAPORE
SEP10 DAYSPONDYCHERRY
SEP10 DAYSMUMBAI
SEP - OCT

15 DAYS(PREPARATORY)

&

5 DAYS

KOLKATA
OCT10 DAYSVADODARA
OCT10 DAYSCHENNAI
NOV10 DAYSCHENNAI
NOV5 DAYSPORT HARCOURT
NOV5 DAYSDUBAI
NOV-DEC

15 DAYS(PREPARATORY)

&

5 DAYS

KOLKATA
DEC10 DAYSPONDICHERRY
DEC10 DAYSMANILA
DEC10 DAYSBATAM
DEC10 DAYSBANGKOK
DEC10 DAYSPONDICHERRY
  • AWS - CWI, CWE, SCWI, ISO LA - 9001, ISO LA -  14000, ISO LA -  18000, API - 510, 570, 653 & ASNT LEVEL - III COURSE CONDUCTED IN VADODARA, SURAT, MUMBAI, CHENNAI, BANGALORE, COCHIN, HYDERABAD, KOLKATA, TRICHY, PONDICHERRY, COIMBATORE, SINGAPORE, BANGKOK, VIETNAM, INDONESIA,THAILAND, DUBAI, DOHA & DAMAM.

COURSE CALENDER CWI

AWS CWI Seminar in Vadodara

Preparatory

Course

Seminar Date
Location
5 DAYS 5 DAYS Vadodara
5 DAYS 5 DAYS Vadodara

 

AWS - CWI Seminar in Kolkata

Preparatory

Course

Seminar Date
Location

16 Aug-

30 Aug

01 Sep-

06 Sep

Kolkata

26 Sep-

10 Oct

11 Oct-

16 Oct

Kolkata

15 Nov-

29 Nov

01 Dec-

06 Dec

Kolkata

 

  • API 510, 570 & 653 WILL START FROM JANUARY ONWORDS IN NIGERIA, DUBAI, VADODARA & THAILAND
  • ASNT NDT LEVEL III TRAINING UT,RT,MT,PT
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Dash Engineering Services, Third party inspection, Design Pressure Vessel, Piping, Process, Pipeline, NACE, API, AWS, ISNT, ASNT, CWI, Pipe Mill, Equipments, Design Review, Shut Down Inspection, Services for Shutdown Activities, Overhauling of Equipments, Inspection, ISO Training, NDT Training, Welding Training, Consultancy

ISO 14000

iso14000 ISO 14000

The increased awareness surrounding environmental issues by customers and suppliers alike is spurring process industries and other manufacturers throughout the world to look for the best ways to integrate environmental management systems (EMSs) into their day-to-day operations.

Bringing anEMSinto the mainstream right alongside other management systems helps businesses meet their customers’ needs, which, in turn, helps achieve their own financial goals. Integrating theEMSinto daily operations also helps to elevate the level of consciousness within a business’s workforce relative to environmental costs and impacts, often overlooked because they are difficult to quantify.

Perhaps most important, as the EMS becomes an integral part of an organization’s daily operating environment, everyone within the organization, including decision makers, manufacturing associates, marketing representatives and finance personnel, take ownership in a process that guides the organization toward achieving much greater productivity.

Why is ISO 14001 needed?

The ISO 14000 standard, often referred to as the “green” standard, sets forth specific requirements for a comprehensiveEMS. Formally published by the International Organization for Standardization onSeptember 1, 1996, the standard was developed to allow organizations to formulate policy and objectives within a structured management systems framework. Simultaneously, legislative requirements, relevant public issues and plant-specific environmental concerns could all be considered.

As the introduction to ISO 14001 states “International standards concerning environmental management are intended to provide organizations with the elements of an effective environmental management system, which can be integrated with other management requirements (or other management systems), to assist organizations in achieving environmental and economic goals.”

iso14000 1 ISO 14000

ISO 14001 specifies the following components of anEMS:

  • Definition of an environmental policy
  • Environmental planning, encompassing identifying environmental aspects and legal obligations, developing objectives and targets, establishing an environmental management program, and specifying the means of achieving objectives
  • Implementation of theEMSand operational control
  • Assessment of conformity with the standard’s requirements and/or company requirements, and corrective action in the case of nonconformity
  • Management review of theEMS

Each of these components must be fulfilled to completely integrate theEMSinto a company’s operating environment and/or achieve ISO 14001 certification.

Those wondering about the need for anEMSshould note that at this time theU. S.is not the main driver for ISO 14000. One also would be naive to think the standard is going away.

With time, many see ISO 14000 certification as the ticket to trade inEuropeandAsia. Already, sufficient evidence exists from a variety of international initiatives that ISO 14001 will be widely adopted. Certification is well under way in theU.K.,Japan,East Asia,Brazil,India,Korea,Argentina,Hong KongandTaiwan.

The Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) has advocated mandatory third-party registration to ISO 14001. The Japanese electronics industry has responded by developing the necessary infrastructure, andU.S.companies are reviewing their existing environmental programs in concert with the ISO 14001 criteria in order to better develop implementation strategies.

Steps along the guideline

iso14000 2 ISO 14000

A company that seeks to integrate ISO 14001 with other management systems in its business must be willing to begin that effort with a strong commitment to environmental responsibility. Perhaps Bin Prasad, manager of quality engineering at Rockwell Automation, best expressed the current “trend philosophy” being adopted by more and more companies when he said, “We really believed at that point (beginning the ISO 14001 pursuit) that our employees and our customers would prefer to do business with a company that espouses an environmental awareness.”

Once the commitment to that philosophy is made and communicated to all employees, the next step is to put in place clearly defined environmental policies, programs, objectives, and targets. Success at this phase allows an organization to both mainstream and fully integrate theEMSinto their business.

As companies begin to get their feet wet entering the process, they should first turn to a variety of often-overlooked aids that may already be available. On-hand information may prove useful, and a business should consider the following list of items—available in almost all organizations’ existing data bases—at the initial stage of development:

  • Documentation of the list of chemicals in the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)
  • Reports prepared for hazard and operability studies
  • Chemicals listed in the Environmental Protection Act (EPA) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical substances inventory
  • Process safety management rules often implemented in manufacturing facilities
  • Examination of Form Rs and Tier I and Tier II reports submitted under the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA)
  • Contingency or vulnerability studies completed relative to critical systems and equipment
  • Data from risk management studies
  • Data from corrective action reports, especially data from preventative maintenance programs and inspections
  • Maintenance records

When assembled, the information from the above list establishes the existing environmental baseline, which, in turn, may be used to help identify and evaluate environmental aspects and impacts.

Next, examine the local environment

This represents a prudent next step, with the reminder that companies should start with the major and obvious. Consider the following:

  • Air/climate factors, including local weather conditions, air quality data, etc.
  • Historic and cultural resources
  • Topography and landscape (US Geological Survey maps)
  • Any recreational uses
  • Proximity to residential areas
  • Watersheds, wildlife sanctuaries, lakes and streams
  • Past practices

Be sure to consider existing data from current operating permits, including the following:

  • Wastewater treatment parameters
  • Air quality emission data
  • Form Rs
  • SARA Tier I/Tier II reports
  • Air emissions inventory
  • Waste characterization studies
  • Listed hazardous waste

This done, an organization is now ready for a review of all key areas. The review should include a re-examination of all legislative and regulatory requirements. Take a look at existing environmental management procedures, feedback obtained from corrective action response systems, results available from completed internal audits, and industry codes of practice. Use technical models, when appropriate, to further review potential environmental aspects and impacts.

Once the base camp relative to the environment has been established, it is time to begin formulating a plan to develop and deploy theEMS. This could include preparing an ISO 14001 general requirements guideline and framework to identify environmental aspects and impacts. Program support needs an up-to-date document reference list to help prepare a step-by-step implementation guideline. Training and development should be considered part of the general requirements.

Organizations also will find it helpful to refer to the Annex A of ISO 14001:1996 (E), and ISO 14004:1996(E) Environmental Management Systems, which contain general guidelines on principles, systems, and supporting techniques to build anEMS that could conform to ISO 14001 requirements.

Set objectives, targets

Objectives are the overall goals for environmental performance based on an organization’s environmental policy and evaluation of environmental aspects. Goals should be set after taking into account the identified environmental aspects as well as the associated environmental impacts. Obviously, special consideration should be given to those identified as significant to the organization and the environment. Targets should be specific, have an established time frame, and be measurable. As companies set objectives and targets, it is worth noting that it is acceptable to consider technological options, financial options, operational options, and both business and customer requirements. Remember to include the views of interested parties such as regulators, the community, stockholders, and nongovernment organizations.

A company should be wary of the temptation to set “appealing” objectives and targets, which can adversely affect the process if they are not linked directly to policy and environmental aspect and impacts. When placed correctly, targets should be linked with environmental aspects, performance indicators, relevant levels and functions of the organization, relevant operational controls, and most important of all, measuring and monitoring activities.

To maintain conformance with the ISO 14001 standard, an organization, as it sets objectives and targets, should discover that the process is a continual one. Each step must take into account the previously taken steps when developing theEMS.

Most companies generate an objectives and targets matrix or checklist and follow it to remain organized and stay on track. An organization should strive for aggressive but attainable targets, and make available the necessary resources, expertise and time to reach the target. Since this involves practical and effective training of the work force, both time and cost for training should be a factor when establishing the time frame for reaching a target.

Implement and get certified

At this point, companies should be ready to begin implementing and completing the integration of ISO 14001 into their existing management systems. During implementation, companies should remember to use procedures and programs from existing management systems whenever possible, continuing to build on what they have.

Using a guideline and developing a checklist tied to the ISO 14001 standard is a wise approach and a key ingredient when planning and integrating anEMSand pursuing ISO 14001 certification. The registrar will be using a checklist, and a company should too. It is also worth noting that objectives and targets of theEMSneed not be totally implemented at the time of a certification audit, but a company needs to have assembled sufficient evidence to show progress in the pursuit of its goals.

A company can gather this evidence by means of an internalEMSaudit that provides objective evidence of implementation, signs that objectives and targets are being monitored and measured, and confirmation that progress is being tracked according to an established time frame.

In summary, as a company successfully integrates anEMSinto its business, its ability to meet its customers needs and expectations will improve.

Create and use a checklist linked to the ISO 14001 standard. Remember that when seeking certification, a company must be able to identify environmental aspects and impacts in a manner clear to the registrar.

Finally, be practical: avoid issues over which the organization has no real control and refrain from writing elaborate procedures.

Here’s one way to develop a practical checklist

Following is an example of a practical implementation guideline, from which each organization’s practical checklist can be developed. The checklist can help focus activities.

  • Implementation team reviews current ISO 14001 standard to determine requirements
  • Identify an ISO 14000 “process owner” at the site
  • Identify all site processes and functions carrying special requirements that are applicable to theEMSto be implemented
  • Define and document a matrix of existing policies and procedures
  • Develop additional procedures to meet requirements, if any
  • Develop internal training material and methods for instruction
  • Train internal auditors and relevant personnel in ISO 14000
  • Develop communication methods, such as a newsletter, to promote ISO 14000 to the facility
  • Implement all new or changed procedures and collect documented evidence of implementation during an internal audit
  • Rectify all non-conformities

Plan the registration audit by writing a scope statement and a strategy for certification

Practical Checklist for Mainstreaming ISO 14000 into Your Business

A heightened awareness of environmental issues by suppliers and customers alike is spurring businesses worldwide to integrate environmental management systems (EMS) into their day-to-day operations.

Mainstreaming anEMShelps businesses meet their customers’ needs and, in turn, achieve their own financial goals. It also helps to raise the level of awareness within a business’ work force to environmental costs and impacts, many times overlooked because they are difficult to quantify.

And, most important, as theEMSbecomes part of a company’s daily operating environment, everyone at a company, including decision makers, manufacturing associates, marketing representatives and finance personnel, takes ownership in a process that leads the business to greater productivity, reduced costs, regulatory compliance, happier customers, and in many cases, increased sales. Companies that pursue the internationally recognized environmental management standard ISO 14001 also gain a valuable marketing tool and are recognized as leaders in environmental consciousness.

ISO 14000

According to the ISO 14001 standard, anEMSshould provide a systematic approach to control the environmental aspects of an organization’s activities or processes. Published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1996, ISO 14000 was developed to enable organizations to formulate policies and objectives within a structured management system framework, while simultaneously considering legislative requirements, relevant public issues and plant specific environmental concerns.

As the introduction to ISO 14001 states, “International standards concerning environmental management are intended to provide organizations with the elements of an effective environmental management system which can be integrated with other management requirements, to assist organizations to achieve environmental and economic goals.”

ISO 14001 specifies the following components of an environmental management system:

  • Definition of an environmental policy
  • Environmental planning, encompassing identification of environmental aspects and legal obligations, developing objectives and targets, establishing an environmental management program and specifying the means of achieving objectives
  • Implementation of theEMSand operational control
  • Assessing conformity with the requirements of the standard and undertaking the corrective action in the case of nonconformity
  • Management review of theEMS

Each of these components must be fulfilled to completely integrate theEMSinto a company’s operating environment, and, if desired, achieve ISO 14001 certification.

Make A Commitment And Begin!

A company seeking to mainstream environmental issues, and/or seeking to earn certification to ISO 14001, needs to begin with a strong management commitment to environmental responsibility.

Once this commitment is made, a company must develop a clearly defined environmental policy, which is appropriate to the organization’s activities, products and services. The policy must include a commitment to continual improvement, prevention of pollution, compliance with relevant environmental legislation and regulations, and provide a framework for setting and reviewing environmental objectives and goals. The policy must be documented, implemented, maintained, communicated to employees and available to the public.

It would also be wise to make a thorough, preliminary examination of all of the information provided in ISO:14001: 1996 (E), the Annex A and ISO 14004, noting the specific requirements and the definitions.

In addition, companies should collect exiting environmental baseline data and information. This helps an organization identify any known existing information that can be used to identify and evaluate environmental aspects and impacts. Often an existing part of a company’s data base, this data can include:

  • Chemicals listed in the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical substance inventory.
  • Coverage of the facility in the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA) list of chemicals.
  • Process safety management rules routinely used in chemical manufacturing facilities.
  • Examination of Form R’s and Tier One and Tier Two reports submitted under the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA).
  • Contingency or vulnerability studies completed relative to critical systems or equipment.
  • Reports prepared for Hazardous Operations (HAZOPS).
  • Data from corrective action reports, especially preventive maintenance and inspections.
  • Data from risk management studies.
  • Maintenance records.

A company should integrate the above data with the information it establishes about its receiving environment:

  • Plant location
  • Air-climate factors, local weather conditions, air quality data, etc.
  • Historic and cultural resources
  • Landscape and topography (USGS maps)
  • Recreational uses
  • Residential areas
  • Lakes and streams
  • Past practices

From this, a business should ascertain whether or not environmental actions are financially feasible, the degree of control a company has over particular environmental aspects, whether or not regulatory issues exist, and if there is technology available to abate or prevent specific environmental problems. After considering the influence a customer has on the company’s profitability, capability to operate, and environmental performance, integration of customer requirements into a company’sEMSshould be made by the organization on a case-by-case basis.

Planning & Implementation

After the relevant information is established, a company should plan the development of theEMSand its implementation. The initiation, maintenance and promotion of the policy are supported by the documentation of significant environmental aspects and impacts associated with a facility and the identification of pertinent laws and regulations. TheEMSis also required to contain documented objectives, measurable targets and a program(s) to be reviewed on a regular basis.

Objectives, the overall goals for environmental performance, should take into account significant environmental aspects and related impacts. Objectives and measurable targets should also be tied to performance indicators, relevant organizational functions, levels and operational controls as well as measuring and monitoring activities.

Program support needs, an implementation guideline and schedule, a document reference list, and a training and development plan should also be part of the planning process.

Implementation of theEMSshould utilize existing procedures, programs and systems whenever possible. The following sample of a practical implementation checklist can help to integrate anEMSinto a company’s day-to-day operations and prepare a company for ISO 14001 certification.

  • Implementation team reviews current ISO 14001 Standard to determine requirements
  • Identify an ISO 14000 process owner at the site
  • Identify all sites, processes and functions carrying special requirements that are applicable to theEMSto be implemented.
  • Define and document a matrix of existing policies and procedures
  • Develop additional procedures needed to meet requirements, if any
  • Develop internal training material and methods for instruction
  • Train internal auditors and personnel in ISO 14000
  • Develop communication methods, such as a newsletter, to promote ISO 14000 to facility
  • Implement all new or changed procedures and collect documented evidence of implementation during an internal audit
  • Rectify non-conformities
  • Plan the registration audit by writing a scope statement and a strategy for certification.

Developing and using a checklist tied to the ISO 14001 standard is key to planning and integrating anEMSand pursuing ISO 14001 certification. The registrar will be using a checklist; the company should, too.

Objectives and targets of theEMSneed not be fully implemented prior to a certification audit. However, a company must gather enough evidence to show progress toward achieving its goals. This can be accomplished by an internalEMSaudit that demonstrates objective evidence of implementation, evidence that objectives and targets are being monitored and/or measured, and the tracking of progress based on the established time frame.

Conclusion

As a company integrates an environmental management system with other management systems within its organization, it will improve its ability to meet customer needs and expectations.

And, as the ties between environmental costs, operations and the customer strengthen, that business should see a continuing decrease in costs, increase in compliance and improvement in productivity, as well as a greater number of satisfied customers.

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